Transit Life

5 Ways to Practice Kindness on Public Transportation

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Transit Life

5 Ways to Practice Kindness on Public Transportation

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Appreciation seems like an appropriate word for 2021. Over the last year, you’ve probably come to appreciate a lot of things that you’ve taken for granted. Something as simple as going outside, seeing your family and friends, or even commuting to and from work all feel like privileges now. And as cities and communities across Canada begin to reopen, they’re privileges we surely won’t take for granted again. 

 

Why thanking the transit driver will make their day and yours

This is why for Transit Appreciation Month, we want to talk about something else we’ve taken for granted. For those who use public transit — either now or pre-pandemic — many of us have long overlooked the significance of bus drivers or transit operators. They play a critical role in our daily lives and rarely get the credit they deserve. But a simple hello, wave of the hand or even a nod of acknowledgement can go a long way in showing the appreciation these public transit drivers deserve. 

It’s easy to overlook the importance of public transportation both historically and in the present day. Public transportation offers us a low-cost, efficient way to get around our cities. Connecting with family and friends and attending events is made much easier. 

For young people, this is usually their primary source of travel. How many memories do you have of jumping on a bus or train to meet up with friends somewhere downtown and hurrying to catch the last bus before it took off? That’s the magic of public transit. It has a way of including itself in our memories and reminding us of places we’ve been or the experiences we’ve shared with friends. 

There’s a code of conduct for everything, including riding public transportation. Here are our top tips to make sure you’re on the right track

For the reasons mentioned above, you should really appreciate the many benefits that public transit brings to your life. And yes, we know that it’s not always perfect. There are some days that you’ll be frustrated with the late bus or that person who refuses to put on their headphones while listening to music. But the reality is that there are over two billion trips on public transit every year in Canada and the overwhelming majority of those trips are positive. 

And speaking of that person who doesn’t want to put on headphones, here are five ways you can show appreciation for your commute and practice some positive public transit etiquette: 

🧑🏻‍🤝‍🧑🏾 1. Wait for people to leave before getting on

Can you say pet peeve? We know, we know; you’re in a rush and have a long way to go and really want to get that last seat. But show at least an ounce of patience and let people leave before you make your way on. 

🤳🏾 2. Wait until you’re off the bus to make phone calls

Have you ever been on a short bus ride and someone is speaking so loudly on their phone that by the time you get off, you know their name, their dog’s name, what they’re eating for dinner, and why they hate politics? Don’t be that person. Especially as we’re still trying to make it through a pandemic, we’re pretty sure that call can wait. 

🙌🏽 3. Say thank you to your driver 

They’re there every morning and evening, usually on time, and dealing with thousands of people every single day. They’re the reason you’re able to leave your car at home and enjoy an evening out with friends. Or why there’s no need to spend your cash on a car in the first place. Saying thank you shows the appreciation that we know you have, but too often don’t verbalize. Try it next time. We’ll bet you’ll see their faces light up. 

🚮 4. Take garbage with you  

Just don’t do this. There’s absolutely no reason that someone should be moving your Tim Hortons cup before sitting down. It’s kind of gross. Not to mention that there are likely garbage cans at whatever stop you get off. Make this a rule: if you walk onto the bus with it in your hand, walk off the bus with it in your hand. 

😷 5. Follow social protocols 

We’re still in the midst of a pandemic, and even when it’s “over,” you should still be practicing whatever guidelines are authorized by your municipality. We all want to feel comfortable travelling on public transportation again, and that takes effort from everyone. Find out how to make your commute less stressful or brush up on ways to ride more safely.

Let Rocketman be your guide 

At Rocketman, we let you know about public transportation safety protocols, low-income travel passes, and how to get the most out of your commute. Our goal is to give you the information you need to get to where you need to be safely and efficiently. 

 

Rocketman transit app for iOS

Rocketman transit app for Android

Appreciation seems like an appropriate word for 2021. Over the last year, you’ve probably come to appreciate a lot of things that you’ve taken for granted. Something as simple as going outside, seeing your family and friends, or even commuting to and from work all feel like privileges now. And as cities and communities across Canada begin to reopen, they’re privileges we surely won’t take for granted again. 

 

Why thanking the transit driver will make their day and yours

This is why for Transit Appreciation Month, we want to talk about something else we’ve taken for granted. For those who use public transit — either now or pre-pandemic — many of us have long overlooked the significance of bus drivers or transit operators. They play a critical role in our daily lives and rarely get the credit they deserve. But a simple hello, wave of the hand or even a nod of acknowledgement can go a long way in showing the appreciation these public transit drivers deserve. 

It’s easy to overlook the importance of public transportation both historically and in the present day. Public transportation offers us a low-cost, efficient way to get around our cities. Connecting with family and friends and attending events is made much easier. 

For young people, this is usually their primary source of travel. How many memories do you have of jumping on a bus or train to meet up with friends somewhere downtown and hurrying to catch the last bus before it took off? That’s the magic of public transit. It has a way of including itself in our memories and reminding us of places we’ve been or the experiences we’ve shared with friends. 

There’s a code of conduct for everything, including riding public transportation. Here are our top tips to make sure you’re on the right track

For the reasons mentioned above, you should really appreciate the many benefits that public transit brings to your life. And yes, we know that it’s not always perfect. There are some days that you’ll be frustrated with the late bus or that person who refuses to put on their headphones while listening to music. But the reality is that there are over two billion trips on public transit every year in Canada and the overwhelming majority of those trips are positive. 

And speaking of that person who doesn’t want to put on headphones, here are five ways you can show appreciation for your commute and practice some positive public transit etiquette: 

🧑🏻‍🤝‍🧑🏾 1. Wait for people to leave before getting on

Can you say pet peeve? We know, we know; you’re in a rush and have a long way to go and really want to get that last seat. But show at least an ounce of patience and let people leave before you make your way on. 

🤳🏾 2. Wait until you’re off the bus to make phone calls

Have you ever been on a short bus ride and someone is speaking so loudly on their phone that by the time you get off, you know their name, their dog’s name, what they’re eating for dinner, and why they hate politics? Don’t be that person. Especially as we’re still trying to make it through a pandemic, we’re pretty sure that call can wait. 

🙌🏽 3. Say thank you to your driver 

They’re there every morning and evening, usually on time, and dealing with thousands of people every single day. They’re the reason you’re able to leave your car at home and enjoy an evening out with friends. Or why there’s no need to spend your cash on a car in the first place. Saying thank you shows the appreciation that we know you have, but too often don’t verbalize. Try it next time. We’ll bet you’ll see their faces light up. 

🚮 4. Take garbage with you  

Just don’t do this. There’s absolutely no reason that someone should be moving your Tim Hortons cup before sitting down. It’s kind of gross. Not to mention that there are likely garbage cans at whatever stop you get off. Make this a rule: if you walk onto the bus with it in your hand, walk off the bus with it in your hand. 

😷 5. Follow social protocols 

We’re still in the midst of a pandemic, and even when it’s “over,” you should still be practicing whatever guidelines are authorized by your municipality. We all want to feel comfortable travelling on public transportation again, and that takes effort from everyone. Find out how to make your commute less stressful or brush up on ways to ride more safely.

Let Rocketman be your guide 

At Rocketman, we let you know about public transportation safety protocols, low-income travel passes, and how to get the most out of your commute. Our goal is to give you the information you need to get to where you need to be safely and efficiently. 

 

Rocketman transit app for iOS

Rocketman transit app for Android

Don’t have Rocketman? Stay on top of your commute by downloading it:

Download Rocketman on the App Store
Get Rocketman on Google Play

Not sure if Rocketman works in your area? View our list of supported regions.

This article offers general information only and is not intended as legal, financial or other professional advice. A professional advisor should be consulted regarding your specific situation. While the information presented is believed to be factual and current, its accuracy is not guaranteed and it should not be regarded as a complete analysis of the subjects discussed. All expressions of opinion reflect the judgment of the author(s) as of the date of publication and are subject to change. No endorsement of any third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products or services is expressly given or implied by Royal Bank of Canada or its affiliates.

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