Transit

7 Ways to Ride More Safely on Transit During the Coronavirus

Transit

7 Ways to Ride More Safely on Transit During the Coronavirus

It’s happening. We’re finally seeing more streetcars and buses with people on them again. And while this is a sign that things are starting to return to whatever your version of normal might be, you still shouldn’t just hop on public transit without understanding how to stay safe. We know your mom told you that you’re the centre of the world, but staying safe is about protecting other people just as much as it is about protecting yourself. So pay attention to what we’re about to tell you because you might learn something, and more importantly, you’ll increase your chances of staying healthy. 

How to ride a bus, streetcar or train more safely through the pandemic

We usually like to keep it light on our posts. Life is short, and we can all use a smile. But safety is an important topic, and we are still fighting through a pandemic, so we’re going to get a little serious with these tips on how to protect yourself and others when you’re commuting. In other words, we really need you to pay attention for a few minutes to get through this post. This stuff is important. We’ll get back to the humour in our next post. 

1. Social distancing 

We’re going to start with the basics, folks, and it doesn’t get more basic than this. It’s simple: stay as far away from people as much as possible. Six feet of space is the minimum, but if you don’t need to be within six feet, don’t be. We know now that coronavirus (COVID-19) germs can spread through close contact. That’s a fact. So you need to do your part and social distance as much as possible when you’re on the bus, train, or streetcar or waiting for any of these vehicles. 

2. Wear a face mask 

We’re actually not asking you to do this — we’re telling you. It’s the law in many cities and provinces that you are required to wear a mask or face covering while on public transit (or in any indoor public space). Doctors have confirmed that wearing a face mask helps prevent the spread of COVID-19 to others and protects you from being infected. Face masks are also useful because they help limit you from touching areas of your face, like your mouth and nose, that can transmit the virus. 

Don’t have a mask? Learn more about where to buy Canadian-made masks online

3. Keep your hands clean 

Maybe you showered before you left home. Great! Maybe you even used your elbow to press the elevator button. Way to go! That doesn’t mean you get a free pass when you’re riding transit. You need to be using hand sanitizer when entering and exiting stations or getting on and off buses, subways and streetcars. If you forgot your sanitizer at home, many transit stations have dispensers at entrances and exits. But even if you do use sanitizer throughout, we still suggest that you wash your hands when you get to your destination even if you somehow haven’t touched anything. 

Read more about how to ride public transit hands-free.

4. Ride at non-peak times if possible 

OK, we admit this tip isn’t as straightforward or basic as the first few. You usually need to be somewhere for a particular time, and that time doesn’t change because there’s a pandemic happening. Still, if it’s possible to leave for work an hour earlier or later, so you’re not exposed to as many people during the rush hour, then do that. If you’re meeting up with a friend after work, try to meet up after the rush is over. The fewer people you’re exposed to during your commute, the less likely you are to be exposed to the virus. Luckily, we’ve built a tool to ease the stress of commuting during peak times. See when your route is typically crowded using TransitCrowds, a website that provides the data you need to adjust your commute and create more space for both you and other riders

5. Use Rocketman’s crowdedness feature 

Yes, we plugged ourselves. It’s our article, and we can do what we want. Seriously, though, we developed an in-app crowdedness feature to help transit riders avoid crowded buses, trains or streetcars based on reports from other riders. It’s taken on more significance during the pandemic because now you can decide ahead of time how comfortable you feel jumping on public transportation. You’ll still have to follow all of the other rules, like social distancing, wearing a mask and handwashing, but this adds another level of safety. 

6. Have your payment method ready 

This is another simple way to reduce exposure times. Don’t be that person digging through your purse or knapsack for your payment card while people roll their eyes behind you. Have it ready before you get on the streetcar, bus, or subway. The faster you’re able to get in and out of these spaces, the less time you’re potentially exposed to germs.

7. Don’t take transit if you’re not feeling well 

Listen, you’re putting other people at risk if you hop on the bus knowing that you’re not feeling well. Knowing what we know now about COVID-19, you shouldn’t be going to work if you’re sick, anyway, so there really is no need to be travelling. And if you absolutely must travel while you’re sick for some reason that we can’t think of right now, then perhaps ride a bike or do something that’s not putting you in contact with other people. That’s one of the major rules in the new world we live in, and you need to be vigilant when following these rules. 

Keep yourself and others safer on public transit 

We all need to do our part to stay safe as we continue to deal with COVID-19. Following these simple suggestions helps to protect you from being infected and from potentially infecting others. These are relatively small inconveniences for a much larger positive outcome, so don’t forget your facemask or be slow to pull out your payment card. We can all do our part to keep each other safe.  

Get notified of transit service interruptions and alerts

Stay ahead of your commute by using Rocketman for real-time transit alerts, arrival times and our new crowdedness feature to avoid busy times on your journey.

Download the Rocketman app:

Rocketman transit app for iOS

Rocketman transit app for Android

It’s happening. We’re finally seeing more streetcars and buses with people on them again. And while this is a sign that things are starting to return to whatever your version of normal might be, you still shouldn’t just hop on public transit without understanding how to stay safe. We know your mom told you that you’re the centre of the world, but staying safe is about protecting other people just as much as it is about protecting yourself. So pay attention to what we’re about to tell you because you might learn something, and more importantly, you’ll increase your chances of staying healthy. 

How to ride a bus, streetcar or train more safely through the pandemic

We usually like to keep it light on our posts. Life is short, and we can all use a smile. But safety is an important topic, and we are still fighting through a pandemic, so we’re going to get a little serious with these tips on how to protect yourself and others when you’re commuting. In other words, we really need you to pay attention for a few minutes to get through this post. This stuff is important. We’ll get back to the humour in our next post. 

1. Social distancing 

We’re going to start with the basics, folks, and it doesn’t get more basic than this. It’s simple: stay as far away from people as much as possible. Six feet of space is the minimum, but if you don’t need to be within six feet, don’t be. We know now that coronavirus (COVID-19) germs can spread through close contact. That’s a fact. So you need to do your part and social distance as much as possible when you’re on the bus, train, or streetcar or waiting for any of these vehicles. 

2. Wear a face mask 

We’re actually not asking you to do this — we’re telling you. It’s the law in many cities and provinces that you are required to wear a mask or face covering while on public transit (or in any indoor public space). Doctors have confirmed that wearing a face mask helps prevent the spread of COVID-19 to others and protects you from being infected. Face masks are also useful because they help limit you from touching areas of your face, like your mouth and nose, that can transmit the virus. 

Don’t have a mask? Learn more about where to buy Canadian-made masks online

3. Keep your hands clean 

Maybe you showered before you left home. Great! Maybe you even used your elbow to press the elevator button. Way to go! That doesn’t mean you get a free pass when you’re riding transit. You need to be using hand sanitizer when entering and exiting stations or getting on and off buses, subways and streetcars. If you forgot your sanitizer at home, many transit stations have dispensers at entrances and exits. But even if you do use sanitizer throughout, we still suggest that you wash your hands when you get to your destination even if you somehow haven’t touched anything. 

Read more about how to ride public transit hands-free.

4. Ride at non-peak times if possible 

OK, we admit this tip isn’t as straightforward or basic as the first few. You usually need to be somewhere for a particular time, and that time doesn’t change because there’s a pandemic happening. Still, if it’s possible to leave for work an hour earlier or later, so you’re not exposed to as many people during the rush hour, then do that. If you’re meeting up with a friend after work, try to meet up after the rush is over. The fewer people you’re exposed to during your commute, the less likely you are to be exposed to the virus. Luckily, we’ve built a tool to ease the stress of commuting during peak times. See when your route is typically crowded using TransitCrowds, a website that provides the data you need to adjust your commute and create more space for both you and other riders

5. Use Rocketman’s crowdedness feature 

Yes, we plugged ourselves. It’s our article, and we can do what we want. Seriously, though, we developed an in-app crowdedness feature to help transit riders avoid crowded buses, trains or streetcars based on reports from other riders. It’s taken on more significance during the pandemic because now you can decide ahead of time how comfortable you feel jumping on public transportation. You’ll still have to follow all of the other rules, like social distancing, wearing a mask and handwashing, but this adds another level of safety. 

6. Have your payment method ready 

This is another simple way to reduce exposure times. Don’t be that person digging through your purse or knapsack for your payment card while people roll their eyes behind you. Have it ready before you get on the streetcar, bus, or subway. The faster you’re able to get in and out of these spaces, the less time you’re potentially exposed to germs.

7. Don’t take transit if you’re not feeling well 

Listen, you’re putting other people at risk if you hop on the bus knowing that you’re not feeling well. Knowing what we know now about COVID-19, you shouldn’t be going to work if you’re sick, anyway, so there really is no need to be travelling. And if you absolutely must travel while you’re sick for some reason that we can’t think of right now, then perhaps ride a bike or do something that’s not putting you in contact with other people. That’s one of the major rules in the new world we live in, and you need to be vigilant when following these rules. 

Keep yourself and others safer on public transit 

We all need to do our part to stay safe as we continue to deal with COVID-19. Following these simple suggestions helps to protect you from being infected and from potentially infecting others. These are relatively small inconveniences for a much larger positive outcome, so don’t forget your facemask or be slow to pull out your payment card. We can all do our part to keep each other safe.  

Get notified of transit service interruptions and alerts

Stay ahead of your commute by using Rocketman for real-time transit alerts, arrival times and our new crowdedness feature to avoid busy times on your journey.

Download the Rocketman app:

Rocketman transit app for iOS

Rocketman transit app for Android

Don’t have Rocketman? Stay on top of your commute by downloading it:

Download Rocketman on the App Store
Get Rocketman on Google Play

Not sure if Rocketman works in your area? View our list of supported regions.

This article offers general information only and is not intended as legal, financial or other professional advice. A professional advisor should be consulted regarding your specific situation. While the information presented is believed to be factual and current, its accuracy is not guaranteed and it should not be regarded as a complete analysis of the subjects discussed. All expressions of opinion reflect the judgment of the author(s) as of the date of publication and are subject to change. No endorsement of any third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products or services is expressly given or implied by Royal Bank of Canada or its affiliates.

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