Product Features

Riding (kinda) Solo: Introducing Our New Transit Crowdedness Feature

Product Features

Riding (kinda) Solo: Introducing Our New Transit Crowdedness Feature

If you had to say, would you classify yourself as a more of an introvert or an extrovert? Regardless of where you get your energy from – the people around you or by being on your own – we bet it doesn’t come from being surrounded by people on a crowded bus, train or streetcar when all you want to do is get to work on time. For a lot of us, the daily commuting ritual is more of a solo activity where you can zone out by listening to a podcast, play Mario Kart Tour on your phone or actively avoid eye contact with the people around you. While the thrill of having a rogue elbow in your side might be exciting for some, now more than ever, the idea of an overcrowded transit vehicle is anxiety-inducing for most.

Since the beginning of the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, public transit usage across Canada has seen a 78% decline in ridership, with transit agencies reporting massive revenue losses resulting in layoffs, reduced scheduled services, and, at times, overly crowded vehicles (especially based on our new norms). Providing daily commuters with relevant information like real-time arrival times and alerts is our bread and butter, which is why Rocketman is introducing its transit Crowdedness feature with the intention of helping to ease some of the anxiety commuters face when getting on transit.

How the transit Crowdedness feature works

Rocketman users across the country will notice a “Report Crowdedness” button on the countdown screen – the place you track real-time arrival times and alerts. Users can use this to inform other passengers about the state of crowdedness on their route, specifically:

  • If there is seating available,
  • If it’s standing room only, or
  • if a vehicle is at capacity and is no longer picking up riders.

Reported crowds will trigger alerts that will be displayed to all users who are looking up that route.

We can’t blame you if you’re asking: “What do too many people on a vehicle look like anyways?” It’s a pretty good question and one where no official guidelines have been released just yet. Meanwhile, transit agencies have already instituted extra precautions like physically limiting seating on vehicles, limiting bus entry access to rear doors only and making changes to payment options. With Rocketman’s new Crowdedness feature, we’re making it easier for users to plan their commute and ease some of the impending anxiety sure to be brought on by crowded vehicles.

You know what they say, “two’s company, three’s a crowd.” While we can’t promise transit will be less crowded, with your help, we can let you know when it is so that you can plan your commute ahead and go back to actively avoiding eye contact with peace of mind.

Start using the transit crowdedness feature

If you had to say, would you classify yourself as a more of an introvert or an extrovert? Regardless of where you get your energy from – the people around you or by being on your own – we bet it doesn’t come from being surrounded by people on a crowded bus, train or streetcar when all you want to do is get to work on time. For a lot of us, the daily commuting ritual is more of a solo activity where you can zone out by listening to a podcast, play Mario Kart Tour on your phone or actively avoid eye contact with the people around you. While the thrill of having a rogue elbow in your side might be exciting for some, now more than ever, the idea of an overcrowded transit vehicle is anxiety-inducing for most.

Since the beginning of the coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis, public transit usage across Canada has seen a 78% decline in ridership, with transit agencies reporting massive revenue losses resulting in layoffs, reduced scheduled services, and, at times, overly crowded vehicles (especially based on our new norms). Providing daily commuters with relevant information like real-time arrival times and alerts is our bread and butter, which is why Rocketman is introducing its transit Crowdedness feature with the intention of helping to ease some of the anxiety commuters face when getting on transit.

How the transit Crowdedness feature works

Rocketman users across the country will notice a “Report Crowdedness” button on the countdown screen – the place you track real-time arrival times and alerts. Users can use this to inform other passengers about the state of crowdedness on their route, specifically:

  • If there is seating available,
  • If it’s standing room only, or
  • if a vehicle is at capacity and is no longer picking up riders.

Reported crowds will trigger alerts that will be displayed to all users who are looking up that route.

We can’t blame you if you’re asking: “What do too many people on a vehicle look like anyways?” It’s a pretty good question and one where no official guidelines have been released just yet. Meanwhile, transit agencies have already instituted extra precautions like physically limiting seating on vehicles, limiting bus entry access to rear doors only and making changes to payment options. With Rocketman’s new Crowdedness feature, we’re making it easier for users to plan their commute and ease some of the impending anxiety sure to be brought on by crowded vehicles.

You know what they say, “two’s company, three’s a crowd.” While we can’t promise transit will be less crowded, with your help, we can let you know when it is so that you can plan your commute ahead and go back to actively avoiding eye contact with peace of mind.

Start using the transit crowdedness feature

Don’t have Rocketman? Stay on top of your commute by downloading it:

Download Rocketman on the App Store
Get Rocketman on Google Play

Not sure if Rocketman works in your area? View our list of supported regions.

This article offers general information only and is not intended as legal, financial or other professional advice. A professional advisor should be consulted regarding your specific situation. While the information presented is believed to be factual and current, its accuracy is not guaranteed and it should not be regarded as a complete analysis of the subjects discussed. All expressions of opinion reflect the judgment of the author(s) as of the date of publication and are subject to change. No endorsement of any third parties or their advice, opinions, information, products or services is expressly given or implied by Royal Bank of Canada or its affiliates.

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